Welcome to Trinity College Library Dublin’s Alerts Page

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This blog and RSS feed is used to send out alerts to members of Trinity College Dublin and those wishing to visit the Library.

Details on admission requirements, opening hours, borrowing rights, and access to the Library’s catalogues and databases can be found at the Library website.

Visitors wishing to see the Book of Kells and the Long Room may visit the Book of Kells website.

Library Opening Hours, June Bank Holiday Monday, 1 June 2015

The Berkeley/Lecky/Ussher, Hamilton and John Stearne Medical Libraries will be closed on Monday 1st June 2015. The 24-hour Kinsella Hall in the Ussher Library and the 1937 Postgraduate Reading Room will remain open by ID card access to Trinity students and staff.

All Library reading rooms reopen on Tuesday 2nd June 2015. For further information please consult our Opening Hours page.

Book Launch in DIT Tonight – Composer James Wilson

Wilson 001The Library has been quietly building a name for itself as a go-to repository for the archives of musicians; among our research collections are the archives of twentieth-century composer James Wilson, bequeathed to the Library in 2005.

Trinity graduate, and now lecturer in DIT, Mark Fitzgerald has written an important study of Wilson and his music which is being launched on Wednesday, 13 May 2015. Mark worked in the Manuscripts & Archives Research Library in the 1990s, cataloguing the papers of composer Gerard Victory.

Since issues of equality and anti-discrimination are in the air, in advance of our upcoming referendum, it seems right to highlight Mark’s theory that the motivation of Wilson and his partner, John Campbell, in relocating from London to Dublin in the 1940s, was the harassment of gay people in post-War London. The home Wilson and Campbell established in Dublin enriched the life of the city in the 1960s and 1970s; Mark comments that ‘their dinners seem to have been noted events on the glittering end of the social scene’.

All are welcome to DIT Conservatory of Music and Drama on Chatham Row at 18.30, on Wednesday for a drinks reception and a chance to purchase this important book at a specially reduced price.

Have a look at the manuscriptsattrinity blog for more detail.

Library Opening Hours, May Bank Holiday Monday, 4 May 2015

On Monday 4th May 2015 the Berkeley/Lecky/Ussher and Hamilton Libraries will be open from 11am to 7pm. The 24-hour Kinsella Hall in the Ussher Library and the 1937 Postgraduate Reading Room will remain open by ID card access to Trinity students and staff.
The John Stearne Medical Library will be closed on Monday 4th May 2015, as will EPB and M&ARL.
All Library reading rooms reopen on Tuesday 5th May 2015. For further information please consult our Opening Hours webpage.

‘Changed Utterly – Ireland and the Easter Rising’, Project Launch, 24 April 2015

1916 Easter Rising Project Launch

Pictured at the Project Launch L to R:
Shane Mawe, Assistant Librarian; Helen Shenton, Librarian & College Archivist; Estelle Gittins, Assistant Librarian

‘Changed Utterly – Ireland and the Easter Rising’ is a weekly series of 52 blog posts which focuses on the Easter Rising and its impact on Ireland.

The project will draw on the rich and diverse collections of 1916 material held in the Research Collections departments of Trinity College Library including diary extracts, letters, pamphlets, newspaper clippings, photographs, and even pieces of clothing. The Research Collections departments comprise of the Manuscripts and Archives Research Library (M&ARL), the Department of Early Printed Books and Special Collections, the Glucksman Map Library and the Music Library.

Launched on Friday 24 April 2015, the aim is to showcase the breadth of our collections related to 1916 and this period of unrest in Ireland’s history. It is hoped that the project will act as a catalyst for research and engage the public ahead of the centenary anniversary in April 2016.

Blog posts are written by the staff in the aforementioned Library departments, and occasionally by Trinity College academics and other experts in the period.

Click here to view the blog.
Follow the project on Twitter: @TCDLib1916